Hello all! My name is Brian. Born in 1985. Musician. Horror nerd. Jurassic Park expert. Science Fiction nerd. I get the most out of life.

29th June 2014

Photo reblogged from Lieutenant Cobretti with 1,612 notes

Source: it8bit

27th June 2014

Video reblogged from Steve Moore with 22 notes

stevemoore2600:

The Guest teaser trailer!!

8th June 2014

Photo reblogged from cinefamily with 22 notes

8th June 2014

Photo reblogged from Cinephilia and Beyond with 57 notes

cinephiliabeyond:

Alfred Hitchcock (foreground left) relays instructions to Joel McCrea (top) on the windmill set of ‘Foreign Correspondent.’ Cinematographer Rudolph Maté stands on the platform at right. Photo courtesy of the brilliant A Certain Cinema. The Criterion Collection’s Blu-ray+DVD of ‘Foreign Correspondent’ is a must-have on your shelf.

In 1940, Alfred Hitchcock made his official transition from the British film industry to Hollywood. And it was quite a year: his first two American movies, ‘Rebecca’ and ‘Foreign Correspondent,’ were both nominated for the best picture Oscar. Though ‘Rebecca’ prevailed, ‘Foreign Correspondent’ is the more quintessential Hitch film. A full-throttle espionage thriller, starring Joel McCrea as a green Yank reporter sent to Europe to get the scoop on the imminent war, it’s wall-to-wall witty repartee, head-spinning plot twists, and brilliantly mounted suspense set pieces, including an ocean plane crash climax with astonishing special effects. ‘Foreign Correspondent’ deserves to be mentioned alongside ‘The 39 Steps’ and ‘North by Northwest’ as one of the master’s greatest adventures.


I had a test pilot go out off Santa Monica. And dive with a camera on the front of the plane toward the ocean. Pull out at the last moment. —Alfred Hitchcock

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

Alfred Hitchcock (foreground left) relays instructions to Joel McCrea (top) on the windmill set of ‘Foreign Correspondent.’ Cinematographer Rudolph Maté stands on the platform at right. Photo courtesy of the brilliant A Certain Cinema. The Criterion Collection’s Blu-ray+DVD of ‘Foreign Correspondent’ is a must-have on your shelf.

In 1940, Alfred Hitchcock made his official transition from the British film industry to Hollywood. And it was quite a year: his first two American movies, ‘Rebecca’ and ‘Foreign Correspondent,’ were both nominated for the best picture Oscar. Though ‘Rebecca’ prevailed, ‘Foreign Correspondent’ is the more quintessential Hitch film. A full-throttle espionage thriller, starring Joel McCrea as a green Yank reporter sent to Europe to get the scoop on the imminent war, it’s wall-to-wall witty repartee, head-spinning plot twists, and brilliantly mounted suspense set pieces, including an ocean plane crash climax with astonishing special effects. ‘Foreign Correspondent’ deserves to be mentioned alongside ‘The 39 Steps’ and ‘North by Northwest’ as one of the master’s greatest adventures.

I had a test pilot go out off Santa Monica. And dive with a camera on the front of the plane toward the ocean. Pull out at the last moment.Alfred Hitchcock

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

8th June 2014

Photo reblogged from Celluloid and Cigarette Burns with 180 notes

Source: churchoflux

8th June 2014

Photo reblogged from Celluloid and Cigarette Burns with 158 notes

Source: psychadelicmassmurder

7th June 2014

Photoset reblogged from As good as dicks. with 263 notes

Legends. 

5th June 2014

Photo reblogged from RETRODUST with 226 notes

5th June 2014

Photo reblogged from Warner Archive with 382 notes

warnerarchive:

Deadly bacteria! Doomsday devices! Robotic spiders! Sound like a big budget sci-fi thriller? Nope. Even better: 

Swat Kats: The Radical Squadron (1993)

warnerarchive:

Deadly bacteria! Doomsday devices! Robotic spiders! Sound like a big budget sci-fi thriller? Nope. Even better: 

Swat Kats: The Radical Squadron (1993)

Source: fuckyeah1990s

4th June 2014

Photoset reblogged from 2087 with 1,828 notes

xombiedirge:

Previews from the Blade Runner inspired music & art show, “Moments Lost”. Opening Saturday, May  31st 2014, at the Bottleneck Gallery / Facebook.

Remaining artwork online Sunday, June 1st 12pm EST, HERE.

Artwork by Andy HauJustin Van GenderenJC RichardCuyler SmithMark Chilcott, Mozpe, Cosimo Galluzzi, SignalstarrLaurie Greasly

Source: xombiedirge

1st June 2014

Photoset reblogged from Diary_of_a_Lazy_Writer with 7,210 notes

iraffiruse:

Animated Posters

YES!

Source: iraffiruse

1st June 2014

Photo reblogged from Science Junkie with 11,630 notes

compoundchem:

Today, a look at the contributing compounds to ‘old book smell’, and the origins of the less well researched ‘new book smell’: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-hV

compoundchem:

Today, a look at the contributing compounds to ‘old book smell’, and the origins of the less well researched ‘new book smell’: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-hV

Source: compoundchem

30th May 2014

Photo reblogged from HORRORFIXXX with 725 notes

26th May 2014

Photo reblogged from 80sActionGoodness with 7 notes

Source: okaythatsfine

26th May 2014

Photo reblogged from 80sActionGoodness with 111 notes

thekhooll:

Deckard’s Blaster
From the movie Blade Runner. It features custom amber grips, dual triggers, and futuristic illuminating LEDs (four red and two green) that can be activated by a small switch mounted beneath the barrel.

thekhooll:

Deckard’s Blaster

From the movie Blade RunnerIt features custom amber grips, dual triggers, and futuristic illuminating LEDs (four red and two green) that can be activated by a small switch mounted beneath the barrel.

Source: thekhooll